Tag Archives: ww1

WW1 The Battle of Loos with Chris Langdon

battle of loos 1915

The Battle of Loos was the largest British battle that took place in 1915 on the Western Front during World War I. It was the first time the British used poison gas and the first mass engagement of New Army units. The British battle was part of the attempt by the Allies to break through the German defences in Artois and Champagne and restore a war of movement.

Jason McCrossan chats to the historian Chris Langdon from the ‪‎Southend‬ museum about this battle which took place 100 years ago this month.

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monday matters with the pretenders & WW1 history

MM Soldiers gas masks

On Monday Matters tonight: Jason chats to the historian Chris Langdon from the ‪#‎Southend‬ museum about the 1st World War and the Battle of Loos – a battle which took place 100 years ago this month & where the British army used poisoned Gas for the first time.

In our Night-Time Report – The Prime Minister has confirmed that 2 British citizens fighting for Islamic state have been killed by an RAF drone in Syria. However, there are claims that it may not have been lawful – nor was it approved by parliament. More on this after 8pm.
Kyra has the latest music news including Kylie Minogue & Radiohead and she’ll delve into the latest new releases.

Our featured group tonight: The Pretenders. Lead singer Chrissie Hynde celebrates her birthday today.

In our Monday Matters tribute – Freddie Mercury would have celebrated his birthday on Saturday – he would have been 69 years old. We have music and interviews from him after 9pm.

For The Fallen by Laurence Binyon

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The poem is read by Gill Fraser Lee (@AHappyflower) on Jason McCrossan’s Saturday Breakfast show on www.sfmradio.com.

This is one of the most famous and enduring war poems, and it was written at an historic moment … just after the retreat from Mons and the victory of the Marne.

As to how it came to be written, Laurence Binyon, who celebrated his 70th anniversary on 10 August 1939, says: “I can’t recall the exact date beyond that it was shortly after the retreat. I was set down, out of doors, on a cliff in Polzeath, Cornwall. The stanza “They Shall Grow Not Old” was written first and dictated the rhythmical movement of the whole poem.

See more at: http://allpoetry.com/For-The-Fallen#s…