Tag Archives: literature

POEM I Do Not Love Thee by Caroline Norton

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Caroline Norton was born in London on 22 March 1808 into a grand but impoverished family. She was the granddaughter of the playwright Richard Brinsley Sheridan. Her father died when she was eight years old, leaving the family with serious financial problems. She found solace from her unhappy to George Norton, who was Tory member of parliament for Guildford, in her writing and the publication of her verses ‘The Sorrows of Rosalie’ (1829) and ‘The Undying One’ (1830) resulted in her appointment as editor of ‘La Belle Assemblée’ and ‘Court Magazine’.

Every Saturday morning on 106.9 SFM (www.sfmradio.com) at around 07:50 it’s tranquil time – where poetry is read out on the radio. Today Gill Fraser Lee reads I Do Not Love Thee by Caroline Norton.

POEM The Snow Storm by Edna St Vincent Millay

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Poet and playwright Edna St. Vincent Millay was born in Rockland, Maine in 1892. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry and was also known for her feminist activism and her many love affairs. She used the pseudonym Nancy Boyd for her prose work. The poet Richard Wilbur asserted, “She wrote some of the best sonnets of the century.”

Every Saturday morning on 106.9 SFM Gill Fraser Lee (@Ahappyflower) reads poems in our Tranquil Time feature at around 07:50. Today Gill reads Edna’s The Snow Storm.

POEM: The Journey by Mary Oliver

Mary Oliver

Mary Oliver is an American poet who was born in Maple Heights, Ohio, a semi-rural suburb of Cleveland.

Her first collection of poems, No Voyage and Other Poems, was published in 1963, when she was 28. She has won the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. The New York Times described her as “far and away, [America’s] best-selling poet”

Every Saturday morning at around 07:50 on 106.9 SFM – Gill Fraser Lee (@Ahappyflower) reads poems in our Tranquil Time spot. Today’s poem is by Mary Oliver and is called The Journey

Author William Stafford speaks to Jason McCrossan

Seeking inspiration, hack writer Hector Mortlake embarks on a journey across late 19th century Europe. He invites the people he encounters to submit short stories to a contest but soon the travellers find themselves at an isolated hotel and caught up in a series of suspicious deaths. Could there be something to the local myth of the water nymph after all?

William Stafford lives and writes in the Black Country. After working in libraries and teaching Drama in schools and colleges, he now devotes much of his time to his novels, which blend his irrepressible sense of humour with science fiction, historical fantasy, or whodunits.

He speaks to Jason McCrossan on 106.9 SFM www.sfmradio.com about his latest novel Kiss of the Water Nymph: A Hector Mortlake Adventure.

Seeking inspiration, hack writer Hector Mortlake embarks on a journey across late 19th century Europe. He invites the people he encounters to submit short stories to a contest but soon the travellers find themselves at an isolated hotel and caught up in a series of suspicious deaths. Could there be something to the local myth of the water nymph after all?

POEM Robert Frost – Come In

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Every Saturday morning on 106.9 SFM GIll Fraser Lee @Ahappyflower reads a poem in our Tranquil Time section.

This morning she reads the American poet Robert Frost’s poem – Come In.

Frost is highly regarded for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech. His work frequently employed settings from rural life in New England in the early twentieth century, using them to examine complex social and philosophical themes. He’s one of the most popular and critically respected American poets of the twentieth century. He was honoured frequently during his lifetime, receiving four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry.

POEM: Winter Landscape by John Berryman

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John Berryman was born John Smith in McAlester, Oklahoma, 1914. From 1955 until his death in 1972, he was a professor at the University of Minnesota.

In the final tranquil Time of 2014 – Gill Fraser Lee reads his poem Winter Lanscape – originally broadcast on Jason’s Saturday Breakfast programme on 106.9 SFM

For The Fallen by Laurence Binyon

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The poem is read by Gill Fraser Lee (@AHappyflower) on Jason McCrossan’s Saturday Breakfast show on www.sfmradio.com.

This is one of the most famous and enduring war poems, and it was written at an historic moment … just after the retreat from Mons and the victory of the Marne.

As to how it came to be written, Laurence Binyon, who celebrated his 70th anniversary on 10 August 1939, says: “I can’t recall the exact date beyond that it was shortly after the retreat. I was set down, out of doors, on a cliff in Polzeath, Cornwall. The stanza “They Shall Grow Not Old” was written first and dictated the rhythmical movement of the whole poem.

See more at: http://allpoetry.com/For-The-Fallen#s…

Gill Fraser Lee reads Ghost House by Robert Frost

Robert Frost
Robert Frost

Robert Frost was an American poet highly regarded for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech. His work frequently employed settings from rural life in New England in the early twentieth century, using them to examine complex social and philosophical themes. A popular and often-quoted poet, Frost was honoured frequently during his lifetime, receiving four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry.

On Saturday morning breakfast on 106.9 SFM Gill Fraser Lee reads his poem Ghost House.

POEM Katherine Mansfield – Camomile Tea

Every Saturday on 106.9 SFM – Jason McCrossan presents Tranquil Time – a moment in time to slow everything down; ponder and relax. The poems are read by Gill Fraser Lee

Katherine Mansfield has been described as courageous, contradictory, self-willed, single-minded, argumentative, elusive, in both her life and her work, and always defied the attempts of posterity to pin down the qualities that fascinated her contemporaries.

Bertrand Russell admired her brain and would have liked to seduce her; Virginia Woolf said she ‘stank like a civet cat that has taken to street walking’ but admitted that she loved her ‘I suppose in my own way’, and that Katherine was the only writer whose writing she was jealous of.