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Top Employer Awards

Working Mums

Workingmums.co.uk has announced the winners of its seventh annual Top Employer Awards, celebrating the leading companies in gender diversity and flexible working.

The Awards, which took place in Workingmums.co.uk’s 10th anniversary year, were presented at a ceremony at London’s Soho Hotel on 1st November where the keynote speakers were MPs Jess Phillips and Flick Drummond, joint chairs of the all-party parliamentary group on women and work.

Winner of the Overall Top Employer Award, sponsored by You At Work, was Sky [pictured]. It was praised by the judges for the strong evidence of its support for diversity, female career progression across the board and family friendly working which was backed up with strong evidence and case studies.

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Awards were presented for eight other categories:

The Top Employer Award for Innovation in Flexible Working, sponsored by M&G Investments, went to Vodafone in recognition of its pioneering global maternity policy which allows women to return from maternity leave on four days a week but get full pay for the first six months, easing them back into the workplace.

The Top Employer Award for Career Progression, sponsored by A.T. Kearney Ltd, went to Sky for its well thought through policies for identifying and promoting women, its ambitious targets, including 50/50 shortlists, which it was succeeding in working towards, its strong mentoring programmes and good evidence of success for its leadership programmes.

The Top Employer Award for Best for Dads, sponsored by IG Group, went to Lloyds Banking Group for its broad range of policies supporting dads, from their Being a Dad course, their Family Matters Network and training and support for managers in how to support dads to including dads on pre and post maternity leave support calls and their agile working culture.

The Top Employer Award for Talent Attraction, sponsored by CA Technologies, went to Berwin Leighton Paisner for its flexible recruitment policies, which included being upfront about flexible working in job adverts and the firm’s pilot of home-based working in a sector not known for flexible working.

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Winner of the Top Employer Award for Family Support, sponsored by Capability Jane, went to Carillion for the range of initiatives it offered to support families, including publications that promoted a changing culture, membership of Employers for Carers, family-related events and its star managers award which were an innovative way of recognising and rewarding good practice.

The Top Employer Award for SMEs with 1-25 employees, sponsored by Johnson Fleming, went to Cuttsy and Cuttsy for a strong, well rounded entry which was genuine and personal.  The judges praised the company for its holistic approach to wellbeing at work and for the fact that all training and benefits were provided across the board, creating a culture of give and take.

The Top Employer Award for SMEs with over 26-250 employees, also sponsored by Johnson Fleming, went to Madgex for its work on female career progression, support for dads and a strong emphasis on flexible working and work life balance across the board.

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Offensive Word Research: Ofcom

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DO NOT READ IF OFFENDED BY STRONG WORDS

Ofcom has published research exploring the latest attitudes to offensive language on TV and radio.  The report looks at words and gestures, exploring what people were likely to find unacceptable, and the reasons why they were judged to be offensive.

Live TV continues to have the greatest reach of all UK media formats, with 92% of people watching each week in 2016. Furthermore, nine in ten adults tuned into the radio, listening for an average of three hours daily.

The groups of potentially offensive language and gestures fell into two broad categories: general swear words – those with clear links to body parts, sexual references, and offensive gestures; and specifically discriminatory language, whether directed at older people, people of particular religions, people with mental health or disability issues, LGBT people, or racist language.

General and other non-discriminatory language
• For general swear words, the emotional impact associated with particular words was important. In particular, certain words like ‘fuck’ or ‘motherfucker’ were regarded as among the strongest offensive language and not acceptable before the watershed, with some respondents having concerns about their frequent use after the watershed.

• Words with clear links to body parts like ‘cunt’, ‘gash’ or ‘beef curtains’ were in general viewed in a way analogous to the more, or most, offensive general swear words. However, many respondents thought the less crass or vulgar words (such as ‘balls’ or ‘tits’) were the more acceptable before the watershed.

• Sexual references like ‘cocksucker’ or ‘prick teaser’ were typically evaluated in a similar way to the more, or most, offensive general swear words. They were seen as distasteful and often unnecessary, but acceptable if used in line with audience expectations after the watershed.

• Offensive gestures were viewed as broadly unacceptable before the watershed, but mostly acceptable after it. The ‘blow job’ gesture was the least acceptable because it was perceived as the most vulgar.

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Discriminatory language
• Unlike other forms of discriminatory language, respondents had few concerns about the terms assessed in this report that were potentially insulting to older people. These were mildly distasteful to some of the older participants, but many (of a range of ages) found them inoffensive or even, to some extent, humorous.

• Many of the words that were discriminatory on religious grounds were unfamiliar to some of the participants.  However, those who were familiar with words such as ‘Taig’ and ‘Fenian’ viewed them as generally offensive and potentially unacceptable.

• Views on words relating to mental health and disability differed greatly. Words such as ‘spastic’, ‘mong’ or ‘retard’ were seen as insulting and derogatory, and therefore viewed as being as unacceptable as the strongestracist insults, with their use requiring significant contextual justification. On the other hand, words such as ‘nutter’, ‘loony’ or ‘mental’ were seen as more commonly – used mild insults, and were therefore much more acceptable, both before and after the watershed.

• Stronger homophobic and transphobic terms such as ‘faggot’, ‘homo’, and ‘chick with a dick’ were seen as very problematic by participants. This was, again, because of the insulting and derogatory nature of the language. These words were considered much less acceptable than general swear words.

• Racist language such as ‘coon’, ‘nigger’ and ‘wog’ were among the most unacceptable words overall; they were seen as derogatory, discriminatory and insulting. Many participants were concerned about these words being used at any time, with their use requiring significant contextual justification.

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The 9pm watershed was considered crucial
The watershed on TV (or considering when children were particularly likely to be listening, in the case of radio) was seen as a good way of striking a balance between protecting children and respecting adult freedoms to watch TV or listen to radio when they wished. It was highly valued by almost all participants.

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Unfamiliar words
Not all words were familiar to participants, and this limited the detailed feedback that could be collected on little-known terms. The least familiar words (those that were recognised by less than 40% of participants) were on the whole slang terms relating to body parts or sex, as well as some ethnic or religious slurs. These words are indicated in this and following chapters with an asterisk (*). Older participants recognised fewer words overall, tending not to recognise more recent slang terms.

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‘Medium words’ were those more often employed as stronger insults, as well as some words considered more distasteful depending on how they were used. They were regarded to be potentially unacceptable before the watershed, although there was some debate among participants.

Words such as ‘cock’, ‘pussy’ and ‘minge’ were seen as significantly stronger; a number of participants described them as more graphic, vulgar, or rude. Overall, this group of words were deemed generally unacceptable before the watershed.

A participant in the survey said “Pussycat is fine but “Stop being such a pussy” puts the word in a different and more offensive context”.  

Participants agreed, however, that the word ‘pussy’ was potentially much more offensive when used as a slang term for vagina.  The words ‘beef curtains’ and ‘bloodclaat’ were recognised by less than half of those who completed the online survey.

However, among those familiar with these words, both were considered generally unacceptable for broadcast before the watershed. Participants classed a small number of terms such as ‘fuck’, ‘motherfucker’ and ‘cunt’ as the strongest and most offensive
terms in this category of non-discriminatory language. They were seen to express very strong emotions, or to be rude and aggressive insults. The cultural norms around these words meant they were less acceptable to use in front of children.

They were considered unacceptable before the watershed by the vast majority of participants. Responses to the word ‘cunt’ were particularly strong. A significant number of participants were uncomfortable with its use even after the watershed. Women were more likely to say it was completely unacceptable, based on its strong vulgar cultural associations. Some women and a few men said they were personally offended and would prefer ‘cunt’ not to be used on TV or radio at all.

 

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Sexual slurs, and more graphic sexual references like ‘cocksucker’, ‘whore’, ‘rapey’, and ‘jizz’, provoked stronger responses from participants. They were considered less acceptable because of their vulgarity, and because they were more likely to be used as insults directed at individuals. Similarly, words such as ‘slut’, ‘skank’ and ‘slag’ were seen as derogatory and vulgar, while words like ‘wanker’ and ‘dildo’ were seen as rude.

 

Discriminatory language
Participants’ in the survey suggested that their views on the acceptability of this type of offensive language on TV and radio differed from their response to the non-discriminatory offensive language and gestures discussed above. In general, discriminatory language was seen as potentially more problematic than more general offensive language.

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Religious insults
The majority of the words in this category were unfamiliar to a considerable number of the participants who took part in this survey. However, these words were generally problematic for those participants who recognised them. Views on acceptability also depended on perceived religious sensitivity. Many participants, even if they did not know the full meaning of the words, were wary of religious terminology because they were worried that people of faith might be offended.

These words were considered generally unacceptable before the watershed but broadly acceptable after it, based on the desire to protect religious
minorities.

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Sexual orientation and gender identity
Most of these derogatory terms, relating to either sexual or gender identity, were seen as very problematic by all participants who recognised them. As a category, they were viewed as insulting, derogatory and discriminatory. As with some racist terms, many participants could not envisage how the stronger words could be used in a non-discriminatory
way.

The word ‘gay’ was debated because it has multiple meanings and is used in multiple ways. Participants considered that it was acceptable when used as a simple identifier for homosexual people. Participants also discussed the use of ‘gay’ to mean ‘not cool’ or ‘not very good’. This caused some concern as it was considered potentially derogatory. While LGBT participants found this use of ‘gay’ less acceptable than participants generally, they did not consider it strongly offensive.

Words like ‘bummer’, ‘fairy’ and ‘pansy’ were medium in terms of acceptability. Participants thought of these words as rather dated and not often used now in a derogatory sense. However, they were still seen as potentially problematic when
intended to insult gay people. Many pointed out that some of these words are now used in the gay community in a humorous way. This meant that they were not always used as insults, thereby complicating decisions about acceptability and making context particularly important.

Words such as ‘dyke’, ‘poof’ and ‘rugmuncher’ were seen as strong and problematic. Participants objected to these types of words on the basis of being intentionally hurtful towards LGBT people. The terms were seen as generally unacceptable except in specific circumstances. For instance, as mentioned in the debated words section, some of these sexual orientation words like (such as ‘poof’, ‘queer’, and ‘dyke’) were seen as having been ‘reclaimed’ by the people they were originally intended to insult as expressions of their identity. In these circumstances the words were not considered
offensive.

Terms such as ‘batty boy’, ‘chick with a dick’, and ‘faggot’ were seen as among the strongest language, and much more likely to be used as insults. Many participants argued these were mostly unacceptable in society in general as they are particularly discriminatory and derogatory. As a result, they were seen as potentially problematic when broadcast on TV and radio, with their acceptability highly dependent on the context. In part, participants wanted to avoid children coming across these words, but there were also powerful concerns about protecting gay and transgender people from being offended or insulted.

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Mental health and physical disability
For participants, the most offensive words were those such as ‘spastic’, ‘mong’ and ‘retard’. In their opinion, these were the most derogatory, and were often used in ways likely to be hurtful towards people with disabilities. As with other strong forms of discriminatory language, participants emphasised that broadcasters should be very careful when using them. They should ensure that there are good reasons for doing so, and that any potential harm and offence are appropriately mitigated.

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Race and ethnicity
Participants in the Ofcom survey had strong views about these words. Racist terms were the most unacceptable category overall because participants considered these words were usually used in a way that was derogatory and discriminatory to others. Participants thought they should normally be broadcast only in limited circumstances and in context, for example in news, drama, or documentary programmes to explore or expose prejudice.

However, participants did make some significant distinctions regarding the acceptability of words within this category. Terms such as ‘Jock’ or ‘Nazi’ were felt to be historical insults whose meaning and use had changed and softened over the years. Indeed, some Scottish participants did not find ‘Jock’ offensive and others expected ‘Nazi’ to be used mainly in educational contexts.

Although there was limited concern about the use of ‘Hun’ as a derogatory reference to German people, the word was seen as less acceptable by those familiar with its use as a sectarian insult. In general, though, these words were of limited concern.  Terms such as ‘pikey’ or ‘kraut’ were debated because some participants saw them as insulting and derogatory to specific groups – and therefore less acceptable – while others viewed them as having developed into more general insults.

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Loophole for iPlayer closes today

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iPlayer loophole closes today

From today, anyone watching BBC programmes only on iPlayer will be required to buy a TV licence to view the content.

Previously a licence was only needed to watch live broadcasts, so catch-up content was technically exempt from the £145.50 annual fee.

But due to a change in the law, a licence will be needed to download or watch BBC programmes on demand.

Those who already have a TV licence will not be affected.

The change comes after the government said it wanted to modernise the current system, so those watching catch-up TV do not get “a free ride”.

The new rules apply to all devices used to access iPlayer – including laptops, smartphones, tablets, TV streaming devices and games consoles, as well as through third-party services such as Sky, Virgin or BT.  However, a TV licence will still not be needed for watching other on demand services, such as ITV Player, All4, My5 or Netflix.

 

 

Midlands Radio Station Sudden Close

Oak 107 FM

A radio station broadcasting to West Leicestershire and Nuneaton closed suddenly and without warning immediately after their 6pm news bulletin on Thursday 28th July.  You can here the final 3 minutes of the broadcast here.

The closure of Oak 107 was posted on the station’s Facebook page by breakfast co-host Mark Rowley who made up Mark and Twiggy from the breakfast show.

The station was sold last year to ATR Media as a merger of both Oak FM and Fosseway.

Presenter Mark Rowley said in an emotion post of Facebook:

Breakfast co-host Mark Rowley

Oak FM was sold by Quidem 12 months ago to ATR Media for an undisclosed sum. It was made up of two previous stations – Fosseway Radio and the original Oak FM. It relaunched in 2014 after a weekend of playing Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody non-stop.

Key 103 Competition inbreach of OFcom rules

Key 103 Manchester

Manchester radio station Key 103 fell foul of the regulator recently after complaints about their ‘Heartless Hotline’ competition.

The breakfast show competition involved a member of the public making a case as to why they should receive a particular prize that they have chosen. The station telephone lines were then opened for 30 seconds, and any listener who wished could phone in and steal the prize for themselves.  If no listener calls in, the person who requested the prize and gave their reason- gets it.

Ofcom received a complaint from a listener who described the treatment of the competition entrant on 27 April as “disgusting”. Separately we received two complaints about the 29 April competition from listeners who considered the competition had not been conducted fairly.

 

The competition went as follows:

The Heartless Hotline competition was introduced by the breakfast show presenters, Mike Toolan (“MT”) and Brooke Vincent (“BV”).

MT: Today’s person facing the Heartless Hotline is Sarah from Eccles. Sarah?
Sarah: Hello.
BV: Hi. You alright?
Sarah: I’m alright. A bit nervous.
MT: You’ve contacted us to try and win your dream prize. Tell everybody what it is.
Sarah: It’s £2,000 to cover divorce costs including a court order

MT: …Tell us the story. You were married – when did it all go wrong?
Sarah: It was just over two years ago and I discovered my husband was cheating on me with somebody he worked with. A couple of weeks after that literally, my dad died unexpectedly. It has been an awful – I can’t tell you what it’s been like the last two years [voice breaks]…sorry I’m a bit upset.
BV: Oh, don’t be upset.
Sarah: [voice wavering] I don’t have any luxuries. I have enough to cover the bills but really if I could get divorced I could also get a court order that would mean that my children’s father would have to help with the housing costs ‘cos I just don’t think, of moving house right now, they could cope with it. It’s just been heart-breaking.
MT: So your ex-husband, well I guess he’s still your husband at the minute until you can get divorced. He’s not helping you pay the bills? Sarah: He’s given me a little bit of basic maintenance but it’s not enough to be able to keep us in the house where we live.
BV: Is that for the kids as well? It’s for everything?
Sarah: Yeah. [voice wavering] You know, for me to lose my support network and for them to lose their friends and possibly have to move schools. I just don’t think they could cope with it.
MT: So you want a sort of court order that will allow you stay in the house
you are in.
Sarah: Yeah, you can obtain a court order which means that he would have to help with housing costs – he would have to contribute a little bit more in order to keep a roof over our heads.
MT: He should be doing it anyway.
BV: He’s in our ‘Bad Dads’ Club’.
MT: […] So you’re paying all the bills. You want to stay in the family home.
You need £2,000.

Sarah: I do work, I work in healthcare. I help look after children and adults with additional needs. It’s not that I don’t work but I just need a little bit more help in order to cover the mortgage…and that would do it really. I have been to see a couple of solicitors so I know what’s involved and I know the exact cost and that [the £2,000 prize] would cover the
paperwork for the divorce and the solicitor’s fees.
MT: So you need £2,000?
Sarah: Yes.

MT: We’ve got it for you.
Sarah: Right [nervous laughter].
MT: I’ve been through a divorce myself, I know exactly what you’re going through and it’s just horrible.
Sarah: It’s awful.
MT: Okay. 30 seconds. We’re going to open up the Heartless Hotline on Key 103. Really good luck Sarah in Eccles. Let’s hope no one calls. Let’s hope people allow you to take this £2,000.
Sarah: Please Manchester. I need this more than anything.
MT: How old are your children?
Sarah: Nine and seven now.
MT: Nine and seven. Aww. Are they okay?
Sarah: They’re okay. They’ve took it hard but they’re okay.
MT: Okay. 30 seconds. [Telephone number given]. It’s up to you if you want to call and steal this cash. It’s on your conscience. The Key 103 Heartless Hotline is now open.

[A ticking clock was heard, followed two seconds later by the sound of a phone
ringing.]

MT: We’ve got a call in already.
Sarah: Oh no.
MT: Hello? Key 103’s Heartless Hotline. Who’s this?
Caller: Hiya. It’s Leigh.
MT: Leigh? Why are you calling us?
Leigh: I want to steal the money.
BV: [gasp] Do you Leigh?
Sarah: Oh no.
Leigh: [laughing]
BV: What you want to steal it for, what do you want?
Leigh: Well I would like a holiday.
BV: But Leigh!
Sarah: This is my children’s future!
Leigh: I know but I’ve got children of my own and I could do with a holiday for us.
Sarah: You could do with a holiday? I could do with keeping a roof over my children’s heads. How could you?
Leigh: Sorry?
Sarah: [Sounding close to tears] I want to keep a roof over my children’s heads and you just want a holiday? Are you serious?
Leigh: I am serious. I’m sorry about this, but yes.
Sarah: You’re not sorry. How could you?
Leigh: Well that’s the name of the game!
BV: I don’t know what to say.
MT: […] Leigh, do you not think this is a bit out of order? Do you not think she’s been through enough and she deserves a chance to fight for the right to keep her kids in the same house?
Leigh: Well…yes, we’ve all got a story to tell and I just need the money myself so I just thought I would ring up.
MT: Okay.
Leigh: Sorry, I didn’t know her situation.
Sarah: Just for a holiday.
Leigh: I just want a holiday. Long overdue.
MT: Alright. Leigh, you’ve won your holiday.
Leigh: Oh thank you! [laughing].
MT: Okay. Bye.
Leigh: Thanks a lot. Bye bye!

MT: Sarah. I don’t know what to say.
Sarah: Okay well, she won it fair enough I suppose.
MT: Stay on the line, we’ll have a chat in a minute.

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After a music track was played the presenters discussed what had happened and
read out messages from listeners. These included:

MT: Sarah Elliot has texted… ‘Words fail me. What a cow!’
BV: I’ve got some on Twitter…we’ve got Jamie who’s put “nearly in tears at Key 103 Heartless Hotline”. I’ve got Tracy Elliot who’s put “what a vindictive, disgusting woman. Sickening”. Nicholas put “to be fair with this Heartless Hotline, you can’t blame people who are stealing. It’s the name of the game” and that’s true but – it’s just hard as these are people’s lives that we are trying to also help but other people are stealing from, so it’s not good.

MT: Someone’s put “you need to stop this evil game now. I’m at the point where I’m going to be switching stations”.
BV: I think the thing is, it also depends what the person is asking for because someone could ask for a car and it’d not be that bad. It’s just like, you know, they’ve stole a car, but when it’s that raw and personal, as a divorce, and someone comes on and tells a story, and someone just goes “yeah”. That’s a bit harsh.

The presenters also spoke to a number of callers over the course of the subsequent 30 minutes. The majority expressed their anger with Leigh for stealing the money, although some defended her actions. By way of example, callers’ comments included:

“I am absolutely disgusted with that woman from Wythenshawe that’s just stolen
that prize…words fail me”.

“That was bang out of order…”.

“…we’ve all been through issues and we don’t know what’s gone on in this girl’s
[Leigh’s] life to make her want a holiday. She could have been through anything
and there’s nothing like a holiday to make you feel better and I think we’re all
judging here without knowing what she’s been through…”.

One listener also offered to donate £100 towards Sarah’s cause which one of the
presenters agreed to match.

Ofcom found that Key 103 were in breach of their Rules 2.3 and 2.13 and said “In our opinion, the Licensee should have been more aware before transmission of the potential for offence arising from including Sarah as a contestant in this competition on 27 April 2016”.

New Community Radio Stations for KENT

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Ofcom has today announced that it has awarded six community radio licences for the South East of England.

Applicants awarded a licence

Ofcom has made a licence award to each of the following:

  • 1 Brighton FM (Alias Music and Community Projects CIC), Brighton and Hove
  • Gaydio (Gaydio Brighton Ltd), Brighton and Hove
  • Platform B (Platform B), Brighton and Hove
  • Radio Cabin (Herne Bay’s Radio Cabin), Herne Bay, North East Kent
  • Sheppey FM (Sheppey Matters), Sheerness, Isle of Sheppey
  • Miskin Radio (North Kent College), North West Kent Gateway

Community radio stations are  licensed for a period of five years from the date of their launch. Miskin Radio will be licensed to broadcast on AM, and Sheppey FM will broadcast to the Isle of Sheppey – the 2nd community radio station on the Island although their focus is on the training and development of adults and young people with physical or mental health disabilities in the area.

Ofcom was satisfied that none of the new services would prejudice unduly the economic viability of any local analogue commercial radio service (section 105(3) of the BA 1990).

 

1 Brighton FM
1 Brighton FM will be a service for the general population of Brighton and Hove

1 Brighton FM will be a service for the general population of Brighton and Hove, and will feature a broad range of specialist music and community shows. Ofcom noted the group’s experience of broadcasting via the internet and the experience of individuals involved (such as in business, marketing, music, audio and website production), and was satisfied that it had demonstrated its ability to maintain the service. The group has a strong volunteer base, and partnerships in place with various community groups which participate in programme-making. Ofcom considered that 1 Brighton FM had built on these to propose workable arrangements for access to the station by the target community. It also has accountability proposals that the decision-makers were satisfied would allow volunteers and listeners to influence the direction of the station.

 

Gaydio will broadcast a service for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in Brighton and Hove
Gaydio will broadcast a service for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in Brighton and Hove

Gaydio will broadcast a service for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in Brighton and Hove. Ofcom noted that members of the applicant group have experience from a range of areas including radio broadcasting, journalism, business and management, and that the applicant company is allied with another company broadcasting to the same target community elsewhere in the UK.  Ofcom considered that the service would broaden choice in relation to existing radio services available in the area by super-serving the LGBT community with a service including contemporary dance and pop music alongside a relatively high volume of LGBT-targeted speech content.

 

 

Platform b
Platform B will be a music-led station for young adults (aged 16-25 years old) in Brighton and Hove

Platform B will be a music-led station for young adults (aged 16-25 years old) in Brighton and Hove. Ofcom noted that members of the applicant group have experience of youth work, music, local broadcasting, finance, IT and digital media, which Ofcom considered would help enable Platform B to maintain its proposed service. The applicant will co-opt two people aged under-25 on to its board, and encourage volunteers to become members of the licence-holding company. It proposes a range of opportunities for access to the station, and also of collecting feedback from the target community to inform its decision-making.

 

Radio Cabin will be a radio station for the general population of Herne Bay, north east Kent
Radio Cabin will be a radio station for the general population of Herne Bay, north east Kent

Radio Cabin will be a radio station for the general population of Herne Bay, north east Kent. The applicant is a registered charity, formed many years ago, and has gained experience through hospital radio broadcasts in the past, as well as broadcasting via the internet and on temporary FM licences.  In Ofcom’s view, the group’s already established community links would help it to promote social cohesion by involving the target community. Ofcom noted that the applicant group already has a volunteer base, as well as a training team, and is experienced in training volunteers. Training will be available to both individuals and community groups.

 

 

Sheppey FM will be a station for adults and young people with physical or mental health disabilities in Sheerness, Isle of Sheppey
Sheppey FM will be a station for adults and young people with physical or mental health disabilities in Sheerness, Isle of Sheppey

Sheppey FM will be a station for adults and young people with physical or mental health disabilities in Sheerness, Isle of Sheppey. The applicant, Sheppey Matters, is a registered charity with experience of running outreach projects from its base at Sheppey Healthy Living Centre.   Ofcom noted that the applicant works with many partner organisations in the area.  It has experience of delivering training, which is a central part of Sheppey FM’s social gain proposals, as well as other benefits, such as promoting healthy living.

 

Miskin Radio will be a community radio service on the AM (medium wave) band for people living in the Gravesham, Dartford and Bexley areas
Miskin Radio will be for people living in the Gravesham, Dartford and Bexley areas

Miskin Radio will be a community radio service on the AM (medium wave) band for people living in the Gravesham, Dartford and Bexley areas. The applicant is North Kent College, and the station will be run by a separate radio members committee, reporting to the College’s senior leadership team. The service will operate from studios within the college, and Ofcom was satisfied that the service could be maintained. The applicant demonstrated a good level of support for the service, as well as links with local bodies.  Ofcom noted the applicant’s proposals for training, including introductory courses, as well as opportunities to train in different locations across the area.

Saturday Breakfast 28 May 2016

jason mccrossan
Jason on 106.9 SFM 100% Local Radio for Sittingourne

On 106.9 SFM – Jason and the full Saturday breakfast show team return for more light hearted news, music and fun on the bank holiday weekend.

In the first hour – The News Quiz – Jason plays a clip from the news but can you guess the news story behind the audio headline & a bonus point if you can identify the person actually speaking.

In Tranquil Time – the poem is from Oliver Hereford – A tragedy in Rhyme.

After 8 – Feather is back up in the SFM helicopter hiding somewhere in the garden of England – she’ll give you the clues all you have to do is work out the location.

In the final hour it is Pick Of The Number One Pops and Paul from the Sittingbourne & Kemsley Light Railway talks about the bank holiday services running.

New community radio licences awarded

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Ofcom has announced the award of five new community radio licences in south east England covering Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and East Sussex.

The 5 new stations are:

Bexhill FM

Bexhill FM
Who will provide a service for the whole community in Bexhill-on-Sea, East Sussex.

 

Hailsham FM

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Will be a service for the general population of Hailsham in East Sussex. Speaking via their twitter account the team said “We are hugely excited to announce that we have been awarded a 5 year FM community radio licence by today”

Red Kite Radio

Red Kite Radio

Will be for the people of Haddenham (Buckinghamshire) and Thame (Oxfordshire). Their website announced the winning bid by saying how they “won the five-year licence after convincing the body that this area deserves and can sustain a full time version of its successful Summerfest Radio broadcasts”.  General Manager of Red Kite Radio Pete MacFarlane told Haddenham.net “Summerfest Radio began nearly four years ago and has grown ever since, heavily supporting the beer festival which has grown significantly during the three summers we’ve been on the air”.  It is anticipated that Red Kite Radio will broadcast 24 hours a day with community news updates & information, interviews with community representatives, local people and organisations.

Witney Radio

Witney Radio

Will serve the community of Witney and surrounding villages in Oxfordshire.  The station tweeted their thanks to Ofcom via their twitter account and said “Proves all the hard work does pay off in the end and the community benefits are huge!”

 

Wycombe Sound

Wycombe Sound

Is for people aged 35 and over in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire.  The station’s Managing Director Chris Phillips released a statement via their website stating “We’re all absolutely delighted. After completing three successful pop-up broadcasts we’re looking forward to putting the service onto a permanent footing. There’s so much going on in this town, we want to share all the good news coming from our community.”

Wycombe Sound will broadcast a mix of local interest interviews and features, together with local news and phone ins. There will be lots of great music too, plus specialist programmes and outside broadcasts.

Community Radio

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Community radio services are provided on a not-for-profit basis, focusing on the delivery of specific social benefits to a particular geographical community or a community of interest.

 

10 years of community radio

Community radio, which offers thousands of volunteers the chance to get involved in broadcasting across the UK, is ten years old.

The last decade has seen the number of community radio stations increase from just a handful to more than 230 stations, each reflecting the local needs and interests of its audience.

In March, Ofcom announced its intention to simplify the way community radio stations record their Key Commitments. This revised approach reduces the administrative burden for licensees, and provides these stations greater flexibility to serve their target communities and deliver valuable social benefits.

A Real Friend At the Hospital Bedside

 

Pete Harvey | Hospital Radio Exeter
Pete Harvey | Hospital Radio Exeter

New research has, for the first time, shown the true impact of Hospital Radio on a patient’s well-being.

It shows stations offer a unique service, giving patients a sense of belonging and helping their psychosocial health, from relieving boredom and loneliness to being a calming influence at what can be – for many – a difficult time, in a strange environment.

Patients, staff and volunteers from over a hundred hospitals, across the UK, were questioned and all suggested the service was a useful aid in helping a patient’s over-all recovery.

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NHS staff told the researchers that Hospital Radio can help ease anxiety during treatment, helping people relax and giving them something else to focus on, rather than the treatment itself.

Grant McNaughton, chairman of the Hospital Broadcasting Association (HBA)
Grant McNaughton, chairman of  HBA

Grant McNaughton, chairman of the Hospital Broadcasting Association (HBA) said: “A lot has changed in the 90 years since the first Hospital Radio station started broadcasting, and patients now have access to a whole range of different entertainment systems – including their own devices which can now store and play their own choice of films, TV programmes and music.

Despite that, Hospital Radio continues to play a strong role and, as the research proves, can make a real difference for that patient feeling isolated and away from their loved ones for a period of time.”

The report was commissioned amid fears some hospital radio stations were being closed down, as part of cost-saving measures within the NHS. Two years ago one station in Guildford was forced off air when the Hospital Trust revealed it wanted to make space available for a Marks and Spencer Store within the hospital.