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Festive Flavours: Christmas Galette

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We continue the run up to Christmas with a variety of vegetarian recipes from the Vegetarian Society.  I will release two every week on Tuesdays and Thursdays.  I would also like to post pictures of the result – so if you make this recipe send me the pictures of your results and I will post on each page (I will do the same).

Today I bring you….

Christmas Galette

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These filled buckwheat pancakes make a luxurious starter.

Serves: 4

Preparation: 10 mins

Cooking: 25 mins

Can be vegan*, Gluten-free, Wheat-free

Ingredients

For the pancakes:

  • 100g buckwheat flour*
  • 300ml milk or soya milk
  • ½ tsp paprika
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil (and some extra for frying)

For the filling:

  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 300g mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 40g walnuts, chopped
  • 100g vegetarian or vegan cream cheese
  • 100ml single cream or soya cream
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves, chopped
  • Salt and pepper

To serve:

  • 100g vegetarian Cheshire cheese or vegan cheese, crumbled or grated
  • Mango chutney and/or cranberry sauce
  • Small side salad (optional)

Method

  1. To make the pancake batter, whisk the buckwheat flour, milk or soya milk*, paprika and vegetable oil together and set to one side. Preheat the oven on its lowest setting.
  1. To prepare the filling, fry the mushrooms in the oil for 5 minutes, then add the remaining filling ingredients and cook for another 5 minutes. Season to taste and keep warm.
  1. To make the pancakes, heat a little oil in a medium non-stick frying pan. Add a quarter of the batter and cook the pancake for around 2 minutes on each side, until set and lightly golden brown. Slide the pancake out of the pan and fold the edges in to create a square shape with the centre exposed. Place the pancake on a baking sheet, cover with foil or greaseproof paper, and keep warm in the oven. Repeat with the rest of the batter.
  1. To serve, place each pancake on a warm plate. Unfold the edges, place a quarter of the filling in the centre, then refold. Sprinkle with the extra cheese* and add a dollop of mango chutney or cranberry sauce, and a side salad if you like.

*Gluten-free buckwheat flour is available in most supermarkets.

Energy: 587 kcals Protein: 20g Carbohydrate: 40g Of which sugars: 21g Fat: 37g Of which saturates: 13.5g Fibre: 7.5g Salt: 1.4g

Visit vegsoc.org/christmas to find the recipes for these fabulous Festive Flavours. Plus there are tips on storing and freezing these dishes so you can be prepared. Or if you prefer to hang-up your apron and take the weight off your feet at Christmas then you’ll be able to get the low down on the favourite ready-made veggie products available in the shops this Christmas.

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5 tips to Beat the Bloat this Christmas from NEW “Gorgeous Greens”

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Chris James Mind Body is supporting healthy eating this Christmas with “5 tips to Beat the Bloat” to accompany the launch of daily sachets of its “Gorgeous Greens”. The new formulation now includes extra enzymes, lipase, amylase, papain, and protease, which help to ease digestion and prevent bloating.

“I wanted to create a superior Greens supplement for busy healthy men and women. Enzymes are a key health trend as we head into 2017!” says Chris James, Founder of CJMB.

Packaged in a very cool cuboid box that looks great in your kitchen, a month’s supply of “Gorgeous Greens” (20 sachets) is just £29.

CJMB’s Gorgeous Greens Super Smoothie
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Serves 2

Ingredients
• Large handful of spinach
• ½ pear
• slice melon
• ¼ ripe avocado
• ½ orange
• 4 x ice cubes
• Almond milk to fill to level
• 1 serving x Gorgeous Greens
• Juice ½ lime (pealed)

Preparation
Juice the pears, melon, orange, spinach and lime. Put the avocado flesh into a blender along with the ice and Gorgeous Greens. Blend everything until smooth. Pour and enjoy!

 

5 tips to Beat the Bloat this Christmas 

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1) Mind your P’s

Avoiding bloat isn’t only about avoiding foods; it’s key to eat more foods that are effective at battling bloat. Reach for a healthy helping of the three P’s: potassium, protein, and probiotics. You can benefit from a boost of potassium-rich foods like sweet potatoes, winter squash, citrus, bananas, and nuts, which help regulate excess sodium!

2) Consume Fibre

Make sure you’re getting enough fibre amidst the trays of holiday snacks. If you know you’re going somewhere that you won’t have a lot of control over your food choices, a fibre supplement can help a lot.

3) Slow down

Eating too quickly can cause you to swallow more air, worsening bloat. Take a full 30 minutes to finish a meal, which will help you banish the bloat and listen for when your body tells you it’s full.

4) Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate

Water helps to speed up digestion and can counteract the effects of salt and carb-induced bloating. Aim for eight to ten glasses a day, especially during the holidays.

5) Start again tomorrow

Most importantly, if you overindulge at Christmas don’t beat yourself up! Indulging once in a while is not that big of a deal—just start fresh tomorrow.

Hospice singers aim for Christmas number 1

Boston’s Blues Rockers Mr. Airplane Man

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Mr. Airplane Man is Margaret Garrett on vocals and guitar and Tara McManus on drums, keyboard and vocals. The band started in the late ’90s and almost immediately joined Morphine for a U.S. tour and recorded a self-titled EP with Mark Sandman (Morphine).

They have released three albums and an EP on Sympathy for the Record Industry garnering high praises from press including Rolling Stone: “Bostonians Margaret Garrett and Tara McManus are deeply sensitive to the inborn ache of the blues. But Garrett’s guitar is the real salvation. It cuts and swings and explodes, crying.” 

Since re-forming the band after a few years hiatus, Margaret and Tara have been gigging around New England and Europe, writing new songs, and recording new material. In October 2015, Dirty Water Records released “The Lost Tapes, an album recorded at The Money Shot (with Bruce Watson of Fat Possum Records) in 1999 and had not been previously released.

Saturday Breakfast with Anthony Hamilton & Dave Cash 22 October 2016.

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In the NEWSQUIZ? Jason plays a clip from the weeks news – but can you work out the story behind the sound?

TRANQUIL TIME: POEM: Alice Meynell – In Autumn

07:40: European Space Probe – It’s been confirmed an experimental Mars lander crashed on the planet’s surface earlier this week. We’ll hear from ExoMars flight operations director Michel Denis.

0810: Trump v Clinton- Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump traded jocular insults at the annual Alfred E Smith charity dinner in New York on Thursday.

08:40: The legendary radio presenter Dave Cash has died at the age of 74. Jason will chat to radio commentator Paul Chantler.

9AM: Pick of the Number One Pops – the songs we play were number 1 on this day; 1968; 1978; 1988; 1998

09:40: FORMULA 1: Lewis Hamilton says he will “take it like a man” if he loses this year’s Formula 1 title to Mercedes team-mate Nico Rosberg. Jason chats to Lewis’s dad Anthony Hamilton.

R.I.P Sir Jimmy Young

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The news broke late last night that the nation lost yet another veteran broadcaster in 2016.

Sir Jimmy Young has died peacefully at home aged 95.

He was one of the original Radio 1 DJs at its launch in 1967.  He then cross channels to Radio 2 in 1973 and filled the early afternoon slot until he retired in December 2002, spending 3 decades at channel 2.

Jimmy was one of the reasons why I loved radio so much.  He had wit, knowledge and timing which took him to the top of broadcasting. I still remember being in a car driven by my father listening to Jimmy – and although I didn’t always understand the content – it was the voice and the style that I was interested in.

Here is a clip of two radio greats – no longer with us – the late Sir Terry Wogan in conversation with the late Sir Jimmy Young in 1978.

Remembered: DJ DaveCash 1942 – 2016

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Dave Cash was one of Radio 1 and Capital Radio’s original DJs who later reinvented himself as a bestselling novelist. Although he originally intended to apply to Radio Caroline, fate intervened and he began working for Caroline’s biggest rival Radio London.

It was during his early days on Radio London that Cash struck up an on-air partnership with a then 19-year-old trainee DJ called Maurice Cole, who became better known to millions as Kenny Everett. After the Government outlawed pirate radio stations Cash joined Radio Luxembourg, then in 1967 he became one of the founding DJs on BBC Radio 1 alongside the likes of Tony Blackburn, Pete Murray and Alan “Fluff” Freeman.

In the late 1960s Cash hosted episodes of Top of the Pops on BBC Television. He supplied the voice-over in The Who’s cult film hit Quadrophenia in 1979 and took a cameo role alongside Dennis Hopper in the sci-fi comedy The American Way (1986). By then he had become programme controller of Radio West, the commercial station based in Bristol, when it was launched in 1981.

In 1999 Cash returned to the BBC, working in local radio across the south of England, broadcasting weekend shows of rock classics and country and western tracks on Radios Kent, Sussex, Surrey, Solent, Berkshire and Oxford. His recollections of life aboard a pirate radio ship, He Sounds Much Taller, appeared as an audio book in 2012.

Jason McCrossan spoke to radio commentator and former colleague Paul Chantler.

Top Employer Awards

Working Mums

Workingmums.co.uk has announced the winners of its seventh annual Top Employer Awards, celebrating the leading companies in gender diversity and flexible working.

The Awards, which took place in Workingmums.co.uk’s 10th anniversary year, were presented at a ceremony at London’s Soho Hotel on 1st November where the keynote speakers were MPs Jess Phillips and Flick Drummond, joint chairs of the all-party parliamentary group on women and work.

Winner of the Overall Top Employer Award, sponsored by You At Work, was Sky [pictured]. It was praised by the judges for the strong evidence of its support for diversity, female career progression across the board and family friendly working which was backed up with strong evidence and case studies.

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Awards were presented for eight other categories:

The Top Employer Award for Innovation in Flexible Working, sponsored by M&G Investments, went to Vodafone in recognition of its pioneering global maternity policy which allows women to return from maternity leave on four days a week but get full pay for the first six months, easing them back into the workplace.

The Top Employer Award for Career Progression, sponsored by A.T. Kearney Ltd, went to Sky for its well thought through policies for identifying and promoting women, its ambitious targets, including 50/50 shortlists, which it was succeeding in working towards, its strong mentoring programmes and good evidence of success for its leadership programmes.

The Top Employer Award for Best for Dads, sponsored by IG Group, went to Lloyds Banking Group for its broad range of policies supporting dads, from their Being a Dad course, their Family Matters Network and training and support for managers in how to support dads to including dads on pre and post maternity leave support calls and their agile working culture.

The Top Employer Award for Talent Attraction, sponsored by CA Technologies, went to Berwin Leighton Paisner for its flexible recruitment policies, which included being upfront about flexible working in job adverts and the firm’s pilot of home-based working in a sector not known for flexible working.

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Winner of the Top Employer Award for Family Support, sponsored by Capability Jane, went to Carillion for the range of initiatives it offered to support families, including publications that promoted a changing culture, membership of Employers for Carers, family-related events and its star managers award which were an innovative way of recognising and rewarding good practice.

The Top Employer Award for SMEs with 1-25 employees, sponsored by Johnson Fleming, went to Cuttsy and Cuttsy for a strong, well rounded entry which was genuine and personal.  The judges praised the company for its holistic approach to wellbeing at work and for the fact that all training and benefits were provided across the board, creating a culture of give and take.

The Top Employer Award for SMEs with over 26-250 employees, also sponsored by Johnson Fleming, went to Madgex for its work on female career progression, support for dads and a strong emphasis on flexible working and work life balance across the board.

Offensive Word Research: Ofcom

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DO NOT READ IF OFFENDED BY STRONG WORDS

Ofcom has published research exploring the latest attitudes to offensive language on TV and radio.  The report looks at words and gestures, exploring what people were likely to find unacceptable, and the reasons why they were judged to be offensive.

Live TV continues to have the greatest reach of all UK media formats, with 92% of people watching each week in 2016. Furthermore, nine in ten adults tuned into the radio, listening for an average of three hours daily.

The groups of potentially offensive language and gestures fell into two broad categories: general swear words – those with clear links to body parts, sexual references, and offensive gestures; and specifically discriminatory language, whether directed at older people, people of particular religions, people with mental health or disability issues, LGBT people, or racist language.

General and other non-discriminatory language
• For general swear words, the emotional impact associated with particular words was important. In particular, certain words like ‘fuck’ or ‘motherfucker’ were regarded as among the strongest offensive language and not acceptable before the watershed, with some respondents having concerns about their frequent use after the watershed.

• Words with clear links to body parts like ‘cunt’, ‘gash’ or ‘beef curtains’ were in general viewed in a way analogous to the more, or most, offensive general swear words. However, many respondents thought the less crass or vulgar words (such as ‘balls’ or ‘tits’) were the more acceptable before the watershed.

• Sexual references like ‘cocksucker’ or ‘prick teaser’ were typically evaluated in a similar way to the more, or most, offensive general swear words. They were seen as distasteful and often unnecessary, but acceptable if used in line with audience expectations after the watershed.

• Offensive gestures were viewed as broadly unacceptable before the watershed, but mostly acceptable after it. The ‘blow job’ gesture was the least acceptable because it was perceived as the most vulgar.

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Discriminatory language
• Unlike other forms of discriminatory language, respondents had few concerns about the terms assessed in this report that were potentially insulting to older people. These were mildly distasteful to some of the older participants, but many (of a range of ages) found them inoffensive or even, to some extent, humorous.

• Many of the words that were discriminatory on religious grounds were unfamiliar to some of the participants.  However, those who were familiar with words such as ‘Taig’ and ‘Fenian’ viewed them as generally offensive and potentially unacceptable.

• Views on words relating to mental health and disability differed greatly. Words such as ‘spastic’, ‘mong’ or ‘retard’ were seen as insulting and derogatory, and therefore viewed as being as unacceptable as the strongestracist insults, with their use requiring significant contextual justification. On the other hand, words such as ‘nutter’, ‘loony’ or ‘mental’ were seen as more commonly – used mild insults, and were therefore much more acceptable, both before and after the watershed.

• Stronger homophobic and transphobic terms such as ‘faggot’, ‘homo’, and ‘chick with a dick’ were seen as very problematic by participants. This was, again, because of the insulting and derogatory nature of the language. These words were considered much less acceptable than general swear words.

• Racist language such as ‘coon’, ‘nigger’ and ‘wog’ were among the most unacceptable words overall; they were seen as derogatory, discriminatory and insulting. Many participants were concerned about these words being used at any time, with their use requiring significant contextual justification.

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The 9pm watershed was considered crucial
The watershed on TV (or considering when children were particularly likely to be listening, in the case of radio) was seen as a good way of striking a balance between protecting children and respecting adult freedoms to watch TV or listen to radio when they wished. It was highly valued by almost all participants.

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Unfamiliar words
Not all words were familiar to participants, and this limited the detailed feedback that could be collected on little-known terms. The least familiar words (those that were recognised by less than 40% of participants) were on the whole slang terms relating to body parts or sex, as well as some ethnic or religious slurs. These words are indicated in this and following chapters with an asterisk (*). Older participants recognised fewer words overall, tending not to recognise more recent slang terms.

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‘Medium words’ were those more often employed as stronger insults, as well as some words considered more distasteful depending on how they were used. They were regarded to be potentially unacceptable before the watershed, although there was some debate among participants.

Words such as ‘cock’, ‘pussy’ and ‘minge’ were seen as significantly stronger; a number of participants described them as more graphic, vulgar, or rude. Overall, this group of words were deemed generally unacceptable before the watershed.

A participant in the survey said “Pussycat is fine but “Stop being such a pussy” puts the word in a different and more offensive context”.  

Participants agreed, however, that the word ‘pussy’ was potentially much more offensive when used as a slang term for vagina.  The words ‘beef curtains’ and ‘bloodclaat’ were recognised by less than half of those who completed the online survey.

However, among those familiar with these words, both were considered generally unacceptable for broadcast before the watershed. Participants classed a small number of terms such as ‘fuck’, ‘motherfucker’ and ‘cunt’ as the strongest and most offensive
terms in this category of non-discriminatory language. They were seen to express very strong emotions, or to be rude and aggressive insults. The cultural norms around these words meant they were less acceptable to use in front of children.

They were considered unacceptable before the watershed by the vast majority of participants. Responses to the word ‘cunt’ were particularly strong. A significant number of participants were uncomfortable with its use even after the watershed. Women were more likely to say it was completely unacceptable, based on its strong vulgar cultural associations. Some women and a few men said they were personally offended and would prefer ‘cunt’ not to be used on TV or radio at all.

 

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Sexual slurs, and more graphic sexual references like ‘cocksucker’, ‘whore’, ‘rapey’, and ‘jizz’, provoked stronger responses from participants. They were considered less acceptable because of their vulgarity, and because they were more likely to be used as insults directed at individuals. Similarly, words such as ‘slut’, ‘skank’ and ‘slag’ were seen as derogatory and vulgar, while words like ‘wanker’ and ‘dildo’ were seen as rude.

 

Discriminatory language
Participants’ in the survey suggested that their views on the acceptability of this type of offensive language on TV and radio differed from their response to the non-discriminatory offensive language and gestures discussed above. In general, discriminatory language was seen as potentially more problematic than more general offensive language.

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Religious insults
The majority of the words in this category were unfamiliar to a considerable number of the participants who took part in this survey. However, these words were generally problematic for those participants who recognised them. Views on acceptability also depended on perceived religious sensitivity. Many participants, even if they did not know the full meaning of the words, were wary of religious terminology because they were worried that people of faith might be offended.

These words were considered generally unacceptable before the watershed but broadly acceptable after it, based on the desire to protect religious
minorities.

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Sexual orientation and gender identity
Most of these derogatory terms, relating to either sexual or gender identity, were seen as very problematic by all participants who recognised them. As a category, they were viewed as insulting, derogatory and discriminatory. As with some racist terms, many participants could not envisage how the stronger words could be used in a non-discriminatory
way.

The word ‘gay’ was debated because it has multiple meanings and is used in multiple ways. Participants considered that it was acceptable when used as a simple identifier for homosexual people. Participants also discussed the use of ‘gay’ to mean ‘not cool’ or ‘not very good’. This caused some concern as it was considered potentially derogatory. While LGBT participants found this use of ‘gay’ less acceptable than participants generally, they did not consider it strongly offensive.

Words like ‘bummer’, ‘fairy’ and ‘pansy’ were medium in terms of acceptability. Participants thought of these words as rather dated and not often used now in a derogatory sense. However, they were still seen as potentially problematic when
intended to insult gay people. Many pointed out that some of these words are now used in the gay community in a humorous way. This meant that they were not always used as insults, thereby complicating decisions about acceptability and making context particularly important.

Words such as ‘dyke’, ‘poof’ and ‘rugmuncher’ were seen as strong and problematic. Participants objected to these types of words on the basis of being intentionally hurtful towards LGBT people. The terms were seen as generally unacceptable except in specific circumstances. For instance, as mentioned in the debated words section, some of these sexual orientation words like (such as ‘poof’, ‘queer’, and ‘dyke’) were seen as having been ‘reclaimed’ by the people they were originally intended to insult as expressions of their identity. In these circumstances the words were not considered
offensive.

Terms such as ‘batty boy’, ‘chick with a dick’, and ‘faggot’ were seen as among the strongest language, and much more likely to be used as insults. Many participants argued these were mostly unacceptable in society in general as they are particularly discriminatory and derogatory. As a result, they were seen as potentially problematic when broadcast on TV and radio, with their acceptability highly dependent on the context. In part, participants wanted to avoid children coming across these words, but there were also powerful concerns about protecting gay and transgender people from being offended or insulted.

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Mental health and physical disability
For participants, the most offensive words were those such as ‘spastic’, ‘mong’ and ‘retard’. In their opinion, these were the most derogatory, and were often used in ways likely to be hurtful towards people with disabilities. As with other strong forms of discriminatory language, participants emphasised that broadcasters should be very careful when using them. They should ensure that there are good reasons for doing so, and that any potential harm and offence are appropriately mitigated.

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Race and ethnicity
Participants in the Ofcom survey had strong views about these words. Racist terms were the most unacceptable category overall because participants considered these words were usually used in a way that was derogatory and discriminatory to others. Participants thought they should normally be broadcast only in limited circumstances and in context, for example in news, drama, or documentary programmes to explore or expose prejudice.

However, participants did make some significant distinctions regarding the acceptability of words within this category. Terms such as ‘Jock’ or ‘Nazi’ were felt to be historical insults whose meaning and use had changed and softened over the years. Indeed, some Scottish participants did not find ‘Jock’ offensive and others expected ‘Nazi’ to be used mainly in educational contexts.

Although there was limited concern about the use of ‘Hun’ as a derogatory reference to German people, the word was seen as less acceptable by those familiar with its use as a sectarian insult. In general, though, these words were of limited concern.  Terms such as ‘pikey’ or ‘kraut’ were debated because some participants saw them as insulting and derogatory to specific groups – and therefore less acceptable – while others viewed them as having developed into more general insults.

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