Category Archives: Politics

The ‘National Living Rage’ Christmas song!

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Siobhain McDonagh is the MP for MP for Mitcham and Morden who brought together a group of MPs to release the ‘National Living Rage’ Christmas campaign song to generate higher public awareness of some UK companies who have been cutting the total pay of their long-serving staff, as a result of the increases to the national living wage.

She spoke to Jason McCrossan on 106.9 SFM about the campaign and her desire to raise awareness of the fact that thousands of people in this country, who are already on low pay, are receiving a pay cut.

 

For more information: http://www.siobhainmcdonagh.org.uk/campaigns/nationallivingrage.aspx

 

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Monday Matters Barry White & Johnny Cash 12 Sept 2016

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On this edition of Monday Matters broadcast on 106.9 SFM.

On the day that former Prime Minister David Cameron announced that he was quitting as an MP – we will hear what he has to say and the reasons why. We will also hear Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn’s reaction to the news.

The featured artist is Barry White celebrates his birthday on Sep 12, 1944. Jason plays 4 songs including taking requests from listeners.

The Palace of Westminster is due for a critical £7bn refurbishment. Darren McCaffrey went to the house to find out more.

Litter currently costs Britain £1bn per year and Jason’s guest tonight has set up a smart phone app which lets users report sights of litter directly to their council to clear it up. Danny Lucas developed the Littergram app over a year ago and as well as chatting about how it works – we also hear how Facebook is trying to force Littergram to change its name.

On the 12 Sept 2003 Johnny Cash died and we have music & interviews from his life.

Krishnan Guru-Murthy sticks the sword in

Sir Craig Oliver was the Communications Director for former Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron, who has recently written a book about their failed attempt to win the referendum.  Channel four news anchor Krishnan Guru-Murthy compared his knighthood to those that have gone before, including Sir Winston Churchill, Francis Drake and Walter Raleigh and ask how his Knighthood compared to his – a reward for failure?  It’s nice to see someone squirm!!

 

Monday Matters Trident Vote & Mandela Day 18 July 2016

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Nelson Mandela – released in 19901after 27 years in captivity

 

Monday Matters with Jason McCrossan as broadcast on 106.SFM.

On the show tonight:

It’s International Mandela day – after 9pm Jason speaks to a biographer of Nelson Mandela – Martin Meredith – about the Mandela’s early life, later life and struggles which saw him go from spending 26 years in a prison cell to becoming the first black President of South Africa.

The Prime Minister says she would be prepared to authorise a nuclear strike.  Theresa May’s made her first Commons speech since entering Number 10, during a debate about renewing the UK’s nuclear deterrent – we’ll discuss the pro’s and con’s with Green Party MP Caroline Lucas and former First Sea Lord and former Security Minister, Lord West.

Our featured artist tonight is Don Henley who is 69 on Friday. The drummer, singer, composer, and co-founder of The Eagles who has also pursued a successful solo career, releasing hits like The Boys of Summer.

Also we have The World Tonight; Not In The News and the latest music news and releases.

 

Professor Ruth Blakeley: Chilcot report & Rendition

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The Chilcot report was published on 6th July by ex-civil servant Sir John Chilcot with the report looked into the origins, conduct and aftermath of the Iraq war – all 2.6 million words of it!!

In this programme Jason McCrossan speaks to Professor Ruth Blakeley from the University of Kent whose had a bit more time to digest the findings and we’ll get her reaction to some people’s call for Blair to be tried for war crimes.

Jason also discusses a project Professor Blakeley is running in conjunction with Westminster University called The Rendition Project – which looks at the CIA’s rendition, detention and interrogation (RDI) programme.

Martin Meredith: Mandela A Biography

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Today is Nelson Mandela International Day (or Mandela Day).  An annual international day celebrated each year on 18 July, which was Mandela’s birthday.

The day was officially declared by the United Nations in November 2009, with the first UN Mandela Day held on 18 July 2010. However, other groups began celebrating Mandela Day on 18 July 2009.

Jason McCrossan spoke to one of his biographer Martin Meredith about a biography which was published in 2010. Also broadcast on http://www.sfmradio.com 106.9 SFM in Sittingbourne.

 

 

 

 

Rolihlahla Mandela was born into the Madiba clan in the village of Mvezo , Transkei, on 18 July 1918. His mother was Nonqaphi Nosekeni and his father was Nkosi Mphakanyiswa Gadla Mandela, principal counsellor to the Acting King of the Thembu people, Jongintaba Dalindyebo. In 1930, when he was 12 years old, his father died and the young Rolihlahla became a ward of Jongintaba at the Great Place in Mqhekezweni 1 .

Hearing the elders’ stories of his ancestors’ valour during the wars of resistance, he dreamed also of making his own contribution to the freedom struggle of his people.

Mandela, while increasingly politically involved from 1942, only joined the African National Congress in 1944 when he helped to form the ANC Youth League (ANCYL).

In 1944 he married Walter Sisulu’s cousin, Evelyn Mase, a nurse. They had two sons, Madiba Thembekile “Thembi” and Makgatho, and two daughters both called Makaziwe, the first of whom died in infancy. He and his wife divorced in 1958.

Mandela rose through the ranks of the ANCYL and through its efforts, the ANC adopted a more radical mass-based policy, the Programme of Action, in 1949.

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Nelson Mandela on the roof of Kholvad House in 1953. Image courtesy of the Ahmed Kathrada Foundation

Dodgy Dave is OUT – Teflon Theresa is IN

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Former PM David Cameron

I do feel for David Cameron.  A month ago he was the PM who was quietly confident that he would win the referendum and would be at this point reshuffling his cabinet and getting on with his ‘economic plan’.

However, we now have a new Prime Minister and a new cabinet.  Gordon Brown declared his first cabinet as a ‘government of all the talents’.   With Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary and Nigel Hunt left in place to fire harpoons at the NHS – I think it’s safe to call this a government with some of the talents.

I’m still not sure if it is an act of pure genius putting Boris in charge of Britain’s diplomacy with the world or an act of pure insanity. But whatever happens Boris won’t be boring.  I’m not even sure if he will be in the job all that long.   He has to work alongside eurosceptic MP David Davis whose ego dwarfs the EU, but who has been given Secretary of State for Exiting the EU – working alongside brexiteer and other ego-phile Liam Fox, the new Secretary of State for International Trade.  These three will find it hard agreeing to seating arrangements around a table – never mind the intricate policy and political details of how we leave the EU.  Fun times ahead.

I understand why Theresa want’s to keep Jeremy Hunt in place.  His nose and hands are already bloodied with his back sore and scarred with the numerous whippings and fist fights he’s had with the NHS.  The Government seem to be determined to push through a new contract on Junior Doctors.  Why get a new minister’s hands bloodied and bruised – better to let Jeremy slug away in Health and then get rid of him when all the damage is done – bringing in a clean pair of hands to try and smooth things over later.

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Boris Johnson reaching out…

The UK just shrunk in stature

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After many months, years and decades of political wrangling and debate over whether the UK should be in or out of the EU – we finally got a decision.

The United Kingdom voted via referendum to leave the EU.  No one really knows how the result of Friday 24th will pan out, but I can’t say for certain that it will be negative – like those who voted to leave can’t say for certain that everything will be ok.

But I do believe the consequences will be far reaching and I do not think we understand them fully.  In 20 or 30 years from now we will look back and be able to trace events which have occurred, events we do not yet know of, back to the result today.

Some of those events will be positive but I’m sure some will also be negative. And

Who would have guessed that the awful events of September the 11th, would have lead to a 10 year war in Iraq and Afghanistan. We understand about Afghanistan- but the problems were on the Afghan/Pakistan border – Iraq had nothing to do with it and has tainted our international politics ever since. When David Cameron tried to help Syria out during its civil war the only thing that was shot down was his plan.

And then, who would have guessed that a street vendor setting fire to himself in Tunisia in 2010 would have lead to an Arab Spring, which eventually lead to tens of thousands of desperate migrants streaming into Europe – which would then be used as means of scaring UK voters via an outrageous poster during the EU campaign.

Who would have guessed that the Labour parties decision to elect Ed Milliband instead of his brother would have lead to an old anti-EU left winger being at the helm of the Labour Party when the UK was asked to make a crucial to stay or leave the EU.   Had Labour chosen David, maybe the referendum wouldn’t have happened at all!

Like most disasters there is no one single incident that proves fatal.  It’s a series of events some linked, some not that come together  at a crucial point just does disaster strikes.  As it was, the vote ended up being about a lack of political buyin from our voters, a fear of immigration and a boot in the face of our politicians.

And so here we are.  The Prime Minister resigns; the stock markets plummet; business is unsure about whether to invest; some considering a move.

What will happen next?  My guess is that it won’t be as bad as people suggest and it won’t be as wonderful as those brexiters would have us believe.  Given the amount of pro-EU support in parliament – I wonder if the anger felt by those of us who voted to remain – will soon be felt by those who voted to leave.  Outcome. Yet again, no one is happy and everyone feels cheated.

Well done, politics, you did it again.

 

 

 

Corbyn Sacks Labour’s main Remain speaker

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The one person who came out strongly for Labour’s EU Remain campaign – and Corbyn sacks him? Everything about Corbyn stinks. He demands loyalty – yet never showed any himself.

Jeremy claims a majority mandate – yet can’t persuade Labour people to vote for him. He blames the media for not getting his message across – yet when you read them they are muddled and confused! He claims to be a conviction MP yet can’t even provide a convincing narrative to defend himself when challenged to account for his actions by members of the public. #labour is not working under Jeremy Corbyn.

When you see Jeremy being interviewed, rather than being friendly and a man if the people – he comes across as sticky and irritable.  Even a Corbyn friend feature by Vice news showed how Corbyn cannot stand when things go wrong – but won’t take responsibility when it does. He blames anyone but himself.

His days are numbered and if Labour don’t dump this disaster – the voters will, come the next election. Can we get our Labour Party back?

Another day – another brutal murder

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Jo’s husband tweet this picture – how he wants his wife to be remembered

Words cannot express the pain and anger that many British people feel at the killing of a UK MP, in broad daylight, on 16 June 2016, on the streets of the small Yorkshire village of Birstall; death snatching the life of one of our most promising Member of Parliament – Jo Cox.

So far all we know is that her attacker was in his 50s, described as a loner who may have mental health issues – but on the latter point we still do not know.

It says a lot about our view of parliament and our politicians that few people outside of her constituency or parliament would have been aware of just how promising and respected Jo was.  She was only in parliament for 18 months – yet managed to punch through not only on political issues but also across the political divide.   Unlike some politicians who would argue over the direction of a worm – just because they couldn’t bear to agree, Jo was different and would work with anyone of whatever persuasion if they shared her views on the various humanitarian causes she championed.

But let’s be clear – Jo wasn’t just an MP – she was a daughter, a wife and mother of two children whom she loved more than anything.  In an emotional yet considered response, after his wife was pronounced dead – Jo’s husband Brendan said: “Today is the beginning of a new chapter in our lives. More difficult, more painful, less joyful, less full of love. I and Jo’s friends and family are going to work every moment of our lives to love and nurture our kids and to fight against the hate that killed Jo”.

We still do not know the cause – however, speaking at the scene of her death the leader of the labour party Jeremy Corbyn alluded to a possible answer when he said “She was taken from us in an act of hatred, in a vile act that has killed her.  It’s an attack on democracy, what happened yesterday. It’s the well of hatred that killed her “.  One assumes that the Prime Minister has been given constant updates by those holding the killer and may have passed on some information to Mr Corbyn.

If you want to know who Jo was and the type of platform that she was forging her way on – just listen to her maiden speech in the House of Commons in 2015.

 

I was on facebook when the news of Jo’s shooting started to break – responding to someone who had written a post on the EU referendum and how they only way to regain our country and stop immigration was to vote to leave.  My critical response to this including lamenting the idea that it is the EU that makes us undemocratic – when we have nearly 900 unelected Peers in the House of Lords with the power to change, delay and black legislation and whom cost the taxpayer about £21 million per year and that we should sort out the deckchairs on our own beach before looking over the water and blaming a messy beach abroad for our troubles.

I also touched on how the focus on immigration and EU bureaucrats let our own MPs and parliament off the hook – and was pretty scathing about our MPs.  Then as news started to roll in that not only had Jo been shot, but had succumbed to her injuries, I decided I could not hit the reply button.  It just didn’t feel right to be having a go at politicians when one had just been murdered on a British street in a small British village.  Maybe me and the British public have been too harsh on our MPs – the majority of whom, are not that different to us and who come within the communities we ourselves live.

I saved a copy of what I have written and I’m now not sure if I will ever respond to Mr Angry about Immigration – because, actually, I don’t want to get caught up in the tit for tat nasty – blown out of all proportion debate that we have had so far.  I will write something – but maybe I will be that bit more respectful to those who govern us – and maybe we all should.  I note that because the killer is white, with links to the far right – no mention of the words “terrorist’ or ‘terrorism’ has been made- yet, it is hard not to imagine if the killers skin colour had of been different – the headlines and news bulletins would be flooded with words trying to link this to some muslim extremist group either here or abroad – like what happened when the soldier Lee Rigby was murdered by a man who had mental health issues – who happened to be muslim.  Maybe we in the media need to also learn to just watch our language and how we present the news to the public.

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Dailymail headline screaming “yet another lorry load of migrants”

If all the public hear from the news that they consume and by certain political groups that we are “awash” with immigrants and that we are ‘full’ ‘cannot cope’ our shores are ‘flooded’ and our politicians are inept and unable to control the ‘flow of immigration’ – then maybe, just maybe, it lights the torch paper in people making them angry which then leads to some, who do not have the full control of their mental state, to see themselves as champions for Britain.  Whist taking the life of a wife and leaving to children without a mother.

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Dailymail clarification – tucked within the pages of the DailyHate