DEAD: Media Mogal Behind Prisoner Cell Block H & Neighbours

36908e8214a228b37bf41212f999f0ae.jpg

Australian media mogul Reg Grundy has passed away on his Bermuda estate at the age of 92.

Reg developed a string of TV hits which defined a decade of Australian TV in the UK including Neighbours,  Prisoner: Cell Block H and Sons And Daughters.

Anyone born in the 70s and brought up in the 80s will remember his programmes vividly and made foreign english accents and phrases – part of our lexicon.

It’s funny how memories can be tied to not only watching programmes but the everyday situations that surrounded them.  I cannot see the name of Sons And Daughters without remembering the old woman that I used to visit with a friend on the way home from primary school aged 11 or 12 years.  She used to always wave at us with her big beefy hands from the living room window as we’d walk past, with our little brown school bags slung over our shoulders.  Then one day, after many months of waving, we decided to knock on her door and say hello.  Subsequently, it became a ritual of going in after primary school in Kirkcudbright and saying hello to her and her little budgy.  She was a big Sons And Daughters fan and we used to sit and watch it with her – although to be fair, I thought it was a really naff programme (which is maybe why I remember it so much).

Here are some memories – in video form.

Neighbours episode – 1988

 

Prisoner Cell Block H – 1979 (1984 UK) – I think…

 

Advertisements

UK Construction firms pay out £10M after “blacklisting” scandal

image

The biggest “blacklisting” scandal in the UK has seen construction firms paying out £10M in compensation.

Unite, the country’s biggest union, has supported 256 workers in court after the UK’s biggest “blacklisting” scandal in history of UK construction.

Around £10M will be paid out to construction workers who were blacklisted by some of Britain’s biggest construction firms, including Balfour Beatty and Sir Robert McAlpine.

The settlement, which will be announced on Monday will see Balfour Beatty, Carillion, Costain, Kier, Laing O’Rourke, Sir Robert McAlpine, Skanska UK and Vinci paying compensation to almost 800 unfairly targeted workers who are being supported by Unite Union. The GMB Union say the amount could reach £75M for 771 claimants.

The blacklist resulted in hundreds of workers losing their jobs and left unable to secure new ones, after being deemed troublemakers while raising legitimate workplace issues.

Over 3,000 building workers were monitored through a shadowy organisation called the Consulting Association, which was eventually raided by the Information Commissioner’s Office after earlier revelations in the Guardian. The blacklist is believed to have been operating for 30 years, with secret files seized by the Information Commissioner’s Office apparently including defamatory references to workers such as “will cause trouble, strong TU”, “ex-shop steward, definite problems” and “Irish ex-army, bad egg”.

Len McCluskey, General Secretary of the Unite Union said: “The massive scale of the agreed damages shows the gravity of the misdeeds of major construction companies which created and used the Consulting Group as a vehicle to enable them to blacklist trade unionists.

“The sums to be paid out go a considerable way to acknowledge the hurt, suffering and loss of income our members and their families have been through over many years.”

Unite said payouts under the latest settlement could range from £25,000 to £200,000 per claimant, depending on factors such as loss of income and the seriousness of defamation.

Tim Roache, General Secretary of the GMB Union said: “Preventing 3,213 workers earning a living to support their families was a gross injustice, and government and employers’ organisations must never forget this sordid episode. Without strong regulation and penalties holding them to account, employers will always be tempted to put profit above people.”

JILL DANDO: UNSOLVED MURDER OF A CELEBRITY

Jill-Dando

Jill Dando was a BBC journalist and presenter who for 14 years worked on successful programmes such as the flagship BBC Breakfast Time, Breakfast News, the BBC One O’Clock News, the Six O’Clock News, the travel programme Holiday, and the crime appeal series Crimewatch (from 1995 until her death). She was named BBC Personality of the Year in 1997.

On the morning of 26 April 1999, Jill was fatally shot outside her home in Fulham, London. No one has ever been successful found guilty of her murder. Local loner Barry George was jailed for her murder in 2001, but his conviction was overturned in 2008 following the emergence of new evidence. No one else has been charged. Her killer still remains at large.

Jason McCrossan spoke to Criminologist Dr James Treadwell from Birmingham City University about this peculiar and extremely sad case.